We’ll learn how to write in cursive script in this “Mastering Calligraphy” class.

Wedding invites and menus at fine restaurants still feature flowing, cursive calligraphy. While it appears to be tough to ink, it is actually made up of only a few simple strokes. Even better, with the Cursive Script, you won’t have to lift your pen from the paper too much!
You’ll learn how to write in cursive letters in this tutorial. However, scroll down below this lesson if you want to save time and get the best calligraphy fonts for your digital projects. Envato Elements has a hand-picked collection of cursive calligraphy fonts.

Let’s start with the complete process of learning how to write in cursive for beginners.

What This Calligraphy Tutorial Will Teach You

  1. How to write in cursive/learn to write in cursive
  2. Cursive Script: How to Write the Alphabet
  3. Lowercase cursive script writing
  4. Uppercase cursive script writing

What You’ll Require

  • Pencil
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Eraser
  • Ballpoint pen or gel pen (any pen with good ink flow)
  • Practice sheet

1. Begin with the fundamental strokes to warm up.

Let’s warm up our hands before we start writing in cursive form.

Step 1: On a blank paper, print four or five of the exercise sheets.

Step 2: Warm up by practicing the basic entrance/exit stroke for one or two lines. Keep in mind that cursive script is all about linked letters; all lowercase letters include entrance and exit strokes to make linking easier.

Step 3: Warm up by practicing the fundamental upward stroke for one or two lines. This stroke is a little novel, but it’s quite simple. Just above the bottom line, you begin. Then you leap to the top of the line.

Step 4: Warm up by practicing the basic curve stroke for one or two lines. This one hasn’t changed, although you might want to curl up a little more than usual. Begin a little below the dashed line and work your way up and around anticlockwise toward the bottom line, curving up and leaving a small space.

Okay! We’re ready to get started now. We’ll cover a very common alphabet called Cursive Script in this tutorial on how to write in cursive for beginners.

2. Cursive Script Lowercase Alphabet: How to Write It

Let’s take a peek at the lowercase cursive script alphabet. It looks almost identical to the cursive you learned in elementary school, as you can see. The directions of the pen strokes are indicated by the red arrows above.

Because the cursive script is all about efficiency, the pen stays on the page for the majority of the letters. Because cursive is primarily on efficiency, the majority of letters will be formed with just one stroke. We’ll begin with the lowercase alphabet, which will be divided into two categories: upward stroke letters and curving stroke letters. So let’s get started with the letters with upward strokes!

Make a copy of the cursive calligraphy alphabet above and keep it handy for reference.

3. How to Write Lowercase Letters with an Upward Stroke

1st step: Let’s get started with some calligraphy letters in cursive. An upward stroke begins the letters b, f, h, I j, k, l, m, n, p, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, and z. Some lines have strokes that go all the way to the dashed line, while others merely go to the dashed line. Some, such as the “f,” go below the bottom line.

To begin, I’ll demonstrate the direction of each stroke. When you’re writing the letters by hand, you can first sketch them out using a pencil. Then all you have to do is trace the pencil lines with your pen. This is also useful for learning how to write a cursive “k.”

2nd Step: Let’s start with the “u” because it’s the most straightforward. Place the tip of your pen on the bottom line. To the dashed line, make an upward stroke. Then, using a downward stroke that drops to the bottom line before swinging back up, create a downward stroke. Make a second downward stroke, ending slightly below the dashed line. Voila! You have a Cursive Script “u” on your screen. Isn’t it a little like sketching waves on the sea?

Step 3: Practice creating the letter “u” three times in order to get the hang of it. The letters I j, m, n, r, v, w, and y are all quite similar to the letter “u.” It’s simple to observe how other letters are formed once you’ve mastered the “u.”

Step 4: Now let’s try a more difficult letter: h. The “h” begins in the same way as the “u,” but its stroke extends to the top line. After that, you create a left arc and a downward stroke to the bottom line. Near the bottom, you’ll cross over your previous line. Curl up and terminate immediately below the dashed line after arcing up to the dashed line and returning to the bottom line with a downward stroke.

Step 5: Practice creating the letter “h” three times in order to get the hang of it. The letters b, f, k, and l are all quite similar to the letter “h.”

Step 6: Using the strokes as a guide, slowly work your way through the remaining curved stroke lowercase letters.

4. Lowercase Curved Stroke Letters: How to Write Them

1st step: Let’s do some more lowercase cursive script practice now. The entry stroke for the letters a, c, d, e, g, o, and q starts at the bottom line and finishes immediately below the dashed line. We curve anticlockwise and round after finishing our entry stroke.

To begin, I’ll demonstrate the direction of each stroke. To feel more at ease, you can always sketch out the letters with your pencil first. Then all you have to do is trace the pencil lines with your pen.

Step 2 We’ll start with the letter “o” because it’s the simplest. Just above the bottom line, place your pen point. Curve around anticlockwise, closing the gap just below the dashed line. Arc up just below the dashed line and curve around anticlockwise, closing the gap just below the dashed line. Then slant down and flick out, finishing on the dashed line. Voila! You have a Cursive Script “o” on your hand. Was it really that difficult?

Step 3 Practice creating the letter “o” three times in order to get the hang of it. It’s simple to observe how the other downward curve letters are produced once you’ve mastered the “o.”

Step 4 Now let’s try a more difficult letter: g. Start the “g” the same way you did the “o,” but instead of making a round shape when you come around, go straight up and close the gap. Then move past the bottom line with a downward stroke. Curl to the left and produce an upward, diagonal stroke that continues up toward the dashed line and terminates just below it. At the bottom line, it should intersect the downward stroke of your “g.”

Step 5 Make the letter “g” three times more to acquire the desired result.

Step 6 Using the strokes as a guide, slowly work your way through the remaining curved stroke lowercase letters.

5. How to Write the Cursive Lowercase Alphabet

It’s time to put it all together and write out the cursive script alphabet in lowercase now that you’ve written each letter several times.

6. Cursive Script Uppercase Alphabet: How to Write It

The uppercase cursive script alphabet follows a distinct set of rules than the lowercase cursive script alphabet and is generally more complicated. The upward strokes have more curls and slants, and the curved strokes are significantly larger. Aside from that, uppercase letters are just as easy to write as lowercase letters.

To feel more at ease, you can always sketch out the letters with your pencil first. Then all you have to do is trace the pencil lines with your pen. When it comes to uppercase letters, I like to draw them out first.

1st step: I didn’t divide the alphabet into groups because most cursive script letters start with a curved stroke. Instead, we’ll just go through it step by step, utilizing the guide above to see which way the strokes travel.

Let’s begin with a simple letter: the letter “L.” Just below the top line, place your pen point. Come up to the top line by arcing down just over the dashed line and around anticlockwise. Then make a downward stroke to the bottom line, arcing over to the left. Your line will have a right-hand slant. Curl up and around when you reach the bottom line. Finally, make a beautiful, smooth curve by sweeping your line out to the right. Voila! You have an uppercase “L” in Cursive Script. It’s all about curls and slants, remember? The greater the size, the better.

Step 2: Practice creating the letter “L” three times in order to get the hang of it. As I previously stated, the more flourish, the better when it comes to uppercase letters, therefore don’t be afraid to use huge curls and sweeping lines. It’s simple to see how other uppercase letters like the C, E, G, O, and Q are produced once you’ve mastered the “L.”

Step 3 Now let’s try a more difficult letter: R. Begin on the top line using your pen tip. Draw a downward stroke from the top line to the bottom line, arcing slightly to the left and ending in a beautiful curl. Then lift your pen to the dashed line and set it there. Make a curving stroke up and around the top line clockwise.

Then bend down to the dotted line and create a loop by going up and over slightly. Make a curved stroke out to the right and down to the bottom line, finishing with a fancy curl once more. Isn’t it a little complicated but not too difficult?

Step 4 Practice creating the letter “R” three times in order to get the hang of it. The letters B, D, F, I, J, P, and T are remarkably similar to the letter “R.” So once you’ve mastered this, you may move on to the next!

Step 5 Work your way through the remaining capital letters slowly, using the strokes as a guide.

It’s time to put it all together and create the uppercase cursive sc now that you’ve written each letter several times.

7. A Cursive Writing Practice Exercise

1st step: Cursive script is extremely popular, and it is commonly used in everyday writing. Let’s put our new skills to the test and create a simple statement now that we’ve learned both the lowercase and uppercase cursive script alphabets.

2nd Step: Begin by recreating the initial stroke of the letter “R” that you learned before. Then, from the left, make a slightly wavy horizontal line to the right, starting a bit below the top line. Then, as we taught before, write the letter “h,” bringing its exit stroke all the way to the dashed line. Continue your line straight down to the bottom line and dip, swinging back up to the top without removing your pen off the page.

Finally, with a little right-hand curve, close the space at the bottom line, reverse direction, and finish with an exit stroke immediately below the dashed line. Dot your I and you’re done with the first and second words! This word will make it simple to write “is.”

Step 3 Write an “h” as we did before, bringing its exit stroke up to the dashed line in a tiny arc, and then write the letter “o” as before. Then come straight down, dip, and swing back up to the dashed line from its small flick. Repeat this process once more, but this time make a small flick at the dashed line. Great work, third word down!

Step 4 Begin writing the letter “u” with an entry stroke, but instead of swinging up from the bottom line, shoot straight down to the final line and loop up as we did with the letter “g” before. Then, moving straight up and gently arcing toward the dashed line, write the letter “o,” linking it to the letter “u” as we did before. Down to the fourth word—simple, right?

Step 5: Using the previous word as a guide, write the letter “w” with an entrance stroke. Make a small diagonal line coming down to the right at the dashed line, halt, and come straight down, dipping and swinging back up to the dashed line to form the letter “i.”

Then swing up toward the top line, stopping just short of it, and then reversing back down to the bottom line. Then make the letter “e” by dipping and swinging back up toward the dashed line. The fifth word has been written!

6th step:  For this word, write the letter I as we did in the previous words, but arc down at the dashed line. Then arc up and down to the bottom line, stopping immediately below the dashed line with an exit stroke. The sixth word has been written!

7th step: Begin slightly below the top line and bend down to the right toward the dashed line for our capital “C.” Then return to the top line, curve to the left, and descend to the bottom line straight. Curve back up to the dashed line to finish.

Maintaining our pen on the sheet, write the letter “u,” straight up to the dashed line, and then the lowercase “r,” as in the preceding word, ending at the dashed line. Then, terminating at the dashed line, create the letter “s,” and then straight down to produce the letter I likewise ending at the dashed line.

Make a little diagonal line to the right from this point, finishing at the bottom line, and then come up, drawing another slight diagonal line to the right, up to the dashed line, and flip out like our “w.” Instead of terminating our flick at the dashed line, we’ll lower it, curve to the right, then circle anticlockwise to form the letter “e.”

We’re on our sixth word, and we’re almost done with a full phrase!

8th step: Starting at the bottom line, make an upward stroke as we taught previously, looping slightly to the left at the top line for our letter “s.” Then, straight down to the bottom line, curving to the left, and up a little—halfway down from the dashed line—come straight down to the bottom line, bending to the left, and up a little—halfway down from the dashed line.

Return to the bottom line and write the lowercase “c,” followed by the lowercase “r,” I “p,” and “t,” in that order. That’s it—you’ve completed the task!

You’ve figured out how to write in cursive!

This is the most common calligraphy style used in everyday writing since it allows for quick and legible handwriting while still looking lovely. I hope you’ve learned that, despite its opulence, it’s a relatively straightforward typeface to write. The more you practice, the easier it will be to ink the letters and the more quickly you will be able to write. We’ll learn a somewhat more sophisticated script that looks even fancier in future sessions.